About your Search

20130319
20130319
SHOW
Cavuto 2
( more )
STATION
SFGTV 23
SFGTV2 21
MSNBCW 18
CNNW 17
FBC 12
CSPAN 9
CNBC 7
KNTV (NBC) 7
CSPAN2 6
KTVU (FOX) 6
KGO (ABC) 5
KPIX (CBS) 5
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 5
KICU 4
KQED (PBS) 4
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 181
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 183 (some duplicates have been removed)
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
neil/lehrer productions >> ifill: supreme court justices weighed a challenge to an arizona law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk to marcia coyle about today's court arguments, and ask about the broader implications for other immigration laws. >> ifill: then we turn to the banking crisis in cyprus, as european union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight
pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
rid of the clearly obsolete voting rights act of 1965. >> the voting rights act has been the law of the land for nearly half a century helping to ensure that are notes are not -- minorities are not denied the right to vote. the law requires states with a history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing how they conduct elections. >> jon: like if you want a loan but have a history of bad credit you may need extra documentation or get a cosigner or if you want to move near a school and you are a sex offender, you have to thrawn by someone. [laughter] shelby county, alabama s leading the charge to strike what they consider to be an unfair provision of the voting rights act. they are hoping to become the jackie robinson's of people who historically disenfranchised people like jackie robinson. >> today shelby county alabama challenged the law at the supreme court. >> the america that elected barack obama is not the america of our parents and grandparents. >> jon: it's a completely different america. we have cell phones now and things cost more than a nickle. coca-cola
and liberal laws to voting rights. not to mention president obama already in a constitutional challenge to his choices to sit on the national labor relations board. they're taking its fight all the way to the supreme court after a d.c. appellate court invalidated the recess appointments made when the senate wasn't in recess. the senator has vowed to block the nomination. other stories we are bringing you tonight, wall street shrugging off a botched european union bailout of banks and an unprecedented tax on the deposits in cyprus, a tiny nation of 1.1 million people that will cost investors hundreds of billions of dollars in market capitalization. the dow jones industrial average down more than 100 points earlier but rebounded losing a modest 62 points. the s&p fell nine, the nasdaq down 11 and a half. the market off of the lows of the day. officials revising the imprudent and unreasonable plan to seize money from bank depositors to pay for the eu bailout. much damage has been done and some investors are so shaken, they will take their money out of the banks at their first opportunity, which i
to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must have a seat at the table. no. 2. community-based organizati
is a highly regarded securities lawyer, a professor at the university of san diego law school, and an expert on sarbanes-oxley. >> the idea was to have a criminal statute in place that would make ceos and cfos think twice, think three times, before they signed their names attesting to the accuracy of financial statements or the viability of internal controls. >> and this law has not been used at all in the financial crisis? >> it hasn't been used to go after wall street. it hasn't been used for these kinds of cases at all. >> why not? >> i don't know. i don't have a good answer to that question. i hope that it will be used. i think there clearly are instances where ceos and cfos signed financial statements that said there were adequate controls, and there weren't adequate controls. but i can't explain why it hasn't been used yet. >> we told partnoy about eileen foster's allegations of widespread mortgage fraud at countrywide and efforts to prevent the information from reaching her, the federal government, and the board of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, th
where this evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain structure who had these types of environmental factors and then start to think about how we want to treat them. do we want to hold those people responsible for their actions or less responsible for their actions. are there certain people who would be better subject to medical treatment instead of incarceration. are there certainly people who we actually think would be
, it was a law professor and a community organizer. and i think he was probably a liberal from the jump. and ted cruise comes out of a different political atmosphere. texas is very different from chicago he has the experience and the background of a guy who made it from scratch in the state of texas, which is -- you know low tax opportunity state. and you see the effect it's had on these two men, not that they wouldn't have those convictions anyway you can see it. >> bill: the nation is going to have to decide i think in the next four years what kind of country they want. because this is not going to be able to compromised. it's too big. brit hume, everybody, living large down there in miami. if you need any help, brit, call us tonight and we will help you out. directly ahead, a grizzly murder in colorado. will the woman beat the rap? there she is. big beef tonight. those reports after these messages. what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by moto
by the open records laws, and the sunshine laws and i think in san francisco we haven't talked to the city attorney about that or your counsel about that but the open records laws and sean -- sunshine laws protect them up to appointment so we're not in a situation where every transmission of information is available to the general public. if that is the case or that becomes the case then we change the strategy around a little bit so we can help to protect the identity of the candidates, not necessarily the backgrounds, but the identity of the candidates by still abiding by those laws. >>i think one of the strengths of your team is the tremendous community involvement and searches that you done. i find it interesting to the work you did in l.a. and many nonprofits. my hope is as our diverse communities expect topnotch transportation selection processes like this that we can involve them in as many of the aspects of the profile and the competencies that we can and i welcome a number of stakeholder groups and give you the recommendations as we sit down to one-on-one conversations. >> thank
. >> and at least in spring through june. >> so we will actually have to adopt the change of the bi laws and we can call the meetings every month. >> i would rather keep it special meetings for may, april and, may, i think that once we get through, this, through the budget, i think that meeting at 9:30 will be appropriate. >> i don't want to go through changing the by laws. >> okay. >> that would be my preference >> thank you so much. the staff, and thank you so much to board members and if there are no further announcements are discussions the meeting is adjourned. >> -- to track stolen phones to be used in the field for other investigative purposes. that is approximately 977 dollars. >> you have a memo from the captain in your packets regarding this do nation. ironically to track cell phone thefts. is there anything you'd like to add? commissioners, questions or concerns? and is there any public comment regarding this matter. >> [inaudible] for quite a few times starting when he was the secretary for the police commission. i have a great deal of respect for him. i believe his promotion was w
, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have powerful evidence that a non-course of system can accomplish that public safety health objective
that put together the healthcare law and stood by politicians when they said stupid stuff like this. >> we have to pass the bill, so that you can find out what is in it. >> neil: well, never mind the lawyers actually knew what was in it. they wrote it. they just didn't feel telling us all the stuff that was in it. push coverage for preexisting conditions or keeping older kids on your policy. gloss over the bad stuff like thousands of part-time workers probably, well, losing the policies, collateral damage. i.e.d. now, top obama architect of that law admitting the obvious, the healthcare law is messy. you think? nothing he neglected to point out a few years ago when the warning could have come in handy. too late. we're knee-deep now and it's costing us through the nose. premiums going up much more than they said. doctors dropping out of their professions, much more than they feared. fine mess, i'm sure, in the fine print. where i'm equally sure there was a blanket policy for policy that would provide no blanket no, warmth, no protection, guarantee you could keep your doctor or plan. no plan
's law to help the seriously mentally ill we see on the streets. these folks are a danger to themselves and others and we must work with the system and put them on the pact through case management and monitoring. for two years now since i've been mayor we call this initiative for the community and it's working. this is helping people chief greater stability so this year we'll make the san francisco law calls laura's law pertinent. it's about public safety arrest despite a year where we experiences to homicides in our city san francisco remains the safest city at levels not seen since the 1960s. one homicide is too many. last year, i i was frustrated like all of you by the rash the homicides and shootings in this very community and i suggested we need to shack up our efforts for the police and communities to stop this voinsz. i regret the upheaval it started but i don't regret this today. since we launched the ipo we've seen some rules no homicides in august since the last thirty years. and homicides and gun violence down over the first part of the year citywide. thank you
that protesters have been harassing anyone going into the clinic. the group doesn't believe it's breaking any laws by setting up just outside of the clinic's entrance. there's already a law that requires protesters to stay at least eight feet away from anyone's clients or workers entering a clinic. the group called 40 days for life is a nationwide anti-abortion group but san francisco supervisor david campos says that law, the current law, is not being enforced. >> the effort here is to really strike the right balance between the rights that people have to express themselves and the right balance of people, the right they have to access health care including reproductive health. >> we're not going away. anything that saves lives, saves babies is obviously bad for business because planned parenthood is the big baby killing business so we're here to save lives. >> so instead of current eight-foot rule, campos will introduce legislation to create a 25-foot buffer zone around the planned parenthood facility. >>> the oakland police department is rolling out a new way to fight crime. the department's ch
for this law bass it is a law that i will like to see pass. the current state of soft story building residents an opportunity -- it's not that -- rather that owners even those that have the desires and resources to make-up grades are stuck in a catch 22 with regards to the pressures they are under in the housing mark. without looking to doing an upgrade seriously those that do remain the suckers as a disadvantage to the peers that do not. what management does is take that a way, 25 percent of the land building owners who were notified and required to do an evaluation did a retrofit. doing it now is inevitable. so why should you do exactly what berkeley did? they haven't passed their mandatory second phase retrofit ordinance yet and now they are the suckers again because of failure of government action to follow through. and only government action can signal to tenants that it's worth paying more for a retrofit unit. we need all stake holders in the environment to receive that. >> thank you very much. next speaker? >> good afternoon supervisors, my name is michael wills. i'm an architect and e
it back to one of my administrative law judges who holds a hearing. the whole process probably takes 2-3 months but in the meantime while that process is going forward, the pass through is stayed and the tenant is not obld obligated to pay. >> it takes 2-3 months to pass this? >> more or less. we have an incentive to expedited this. it would be after a lot of postponement because they are ill or something like that. usually what i do is try and call the other side. call the landlord and say could you please extend this pass through and usually they are cooperative. >> how long would you know this -- how well-known do you think this application is amongst renters? >> we think it's quite well-known because anytime we send a decision that contains a pass through. we send out a memorandum you mean in three languages that refer tenants to organizations to do actual outreach around hardship applications. i will admit, it's not pleasant. tenants, there is no privacy involved. once you say i cannot afford to pay a pass through that the landlord is required to. you have to prove that it you ha
, transportation venues, urs has supported more than 400 of the fortune 500 firms and state, and law law enforcement we have a workforce of over 50,000 individuals and have the much sought after safety act certification. the individuals that we used on the subject matter team and portion of this, they have got a wealth of background, and very indepth, we have phds in there. you have got, structural engineers. pes, hvac, meps, there is a whole range of law enforcement. so we brought a wealth of experience and a lot of people to this particular project. who have good experience with transportation, i should say that all of these individuals have transportation backgrounds as well. >> one of the reasons that urs is in a very good position to look at the transit center is because of our out reach, we have got extraordinary advantage to access and look at threatening information on a daily basis that is due in part to the contracts that we hold. some classified and some open. this access is conducted on a constant basis and we use it to validate the threats so that we know what is going on ev
, and law enforcement for numbers. it was more of a community. i did not go to school and meet somebody. i lived on this block and this is where my grandmother's house was, or i was born and raised. what people may see on tv was at my front door. the killing and the dope dealing. it was right there. this was a community list of people, we just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it w
acts of violence. the afternoon's panel will have a debate about a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and th
of law. [applause] and on the life question, it's really pretty simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run against me, not one second, by the way. [applause] but they're in the business of trying to undermine and weaken us, and i didn't back up on any principle. we debated the issue of life, and i said my opponent, my leftist opponent cannot answer two questions on life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. and at what moment does life begin? the instant of conception. and the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those questions. they know they lose the debate. i stood on life, and i stood on marriage -- [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people that have been backing away from these challenges don't seem to realize that i'm still standing. [applause] now, why
. tonight, the fast and furious reaction in washington one of the healthcare laws very principal architects al but admitting it. >> i think we know at it going be messy. things will come up that are unanticipated. >> neil: you think it created a fire storm, you should see what happened when the g.o.p. piles on jeff. [sirens] >> neil: nurse, nurse, paddle. stat. this healthcare thing, fading fast? >> neil: welcome, glad to have you. i'm neil could suit few. ten months before the president's healthcare law kicks in, here's what happens when one of its chief architects messes up. congress just blows up. >> i think they loaded all the sweeteners before the election, now all the real work is being done after it. and they did leave -- didn't leave themselves enough time. >> neil: he is not alone. mitch mcconnell telling us moments ago, i quote, messy bill that they didn't read and nearly 20,000 pages of new regulations leading to a messy result. florida senator marco rubio saying, as the ramifications apply, we're going to see how truly messy and disastrous this program will be for americans. so
legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose of the bill is that it would help alleviate overcrowding in state prisons and county jails, and ease pressure on california's court system and result in millions of dollars in annual savings for both state and local governments. senator mark leno who couldn't join us today as been quoted as saying, quote, there's been no evidence to suggest long prison sentences deter or limit people from abusing drugs. in fact, time behind bars and felony records often have horrible, unintended consequences for people trying to overcome addiction because they are unlikely to receive drug treatment in prison and have few job prospects and educational opportunities when they leave. this legislation will help implement public safety realignment and protect our communities by reserving prison and jail space f
what? i really want to talk to you about that. because i am very proud of law enforcement stepping in. on february 6th, 2013, that the police commissioners meeting, last month, i gave you paperwork and spoke with all of you about fighting crime as i always do. i would like to thank you for listening and acting quickly. a lot of good police officers answered the call of duty and i want to salute them. i love hard core law enforcement. you guys took a big bite out of crime during the month of february. i want it to continue. i am very proud of law enforcement for stepping hard on crime. i urge you to continue with tough action, it has to be. once again, i say stop and frisk is a must and you know why. hard core law enforcement must continue all crime must be punished don't let anyone get away with anything. keep stepping hard on crime, it is needed on a 24-7 basis. and i know that you need this, i know that you know it, and i know that we need a budget that supports that as well. and i want you to understand that i seriously believe in tactical law enforcement. it is a must as well. and
of national voting rights laws. next to that story in the washington times, g.o.p. takes issue with e.p.a. nominee senator roy blunt saying he will place a hold on jeannie mcathey poised to take over the aines until -- >> and then on the nomination, they come out with a lengthy piece opposing mr. perez saying obama's nominee muscled a city to drop a supreme court case. then on gay marriage, new poll out from washington, d.c. shows record support for gay marriage. this comes ahead of tuesday's oral argument next tuesday's oral argument at the supreme court where they will be taking up two cases related to gay marriage. and then here is the "new york post" with this headline. host: here's what the former secretary of state had to say in a video posted online. >> suspect marriage for lesbian and gay couples. >> i support it personally and as a matter of policy and law. embedded in a broader effort to advance equality and opportunity for lgbt americans and all americans. like so many others, my personal views have been shaped over time by people i have known and loved. by my experience re
from everything to mechanics to campaign finance laws. >> greta: one of the questions, the perception according to you, is that the republican party-- >> according to polling. >> greta: a party of rich-- yeah, polling. party of rich, narrow, stuffy, out of touch people and you want to reach the minority, female and young. >> greta: how do you convince you have anything for them if you're part of the rich, stuffy-- >> and obviously that's perception. part of is if you're not showing up in the community, the perception and narrative becomes reality. when we announced yesterday and today is that the national party -- in 2013, mind you, after a presidential election, that's never been done, is just going to spend just on the political oranges itself 10 million dollars which will include hundreds, a few people down the hallway, but hundreds of people in communities across the country advocating for our party in asian, hispanic, african-american communities making their presence known, going to community events, swearing in ceremonies, everything. >> greta: one of the complaints i've had al
plans to sign three new gun control laws tomorrow. here is a look at 13469 nsome o new legislation. keep in mind colorado home to two of the deadliest mass shootings in u.s. history. last year's aurora theater shooting and the massacre at columbine high school. >>> this is a crazy story. 13 pieces of art, $500 million, poof, gone in 81 seconds. you have these two men dressed as police, they target this boston museum here. get away with one of the biggest thefts in history. this is a crime that's gone unsolved 23 years. the fbi is revealing new information. we'll talk to the museum's security director next. >>> we're taking you back 23 years. yesterday one of the biggest art heights in american history this boston, 81 minutes, that's all it took, 13 masterpieces, stolen. take a listen. >> the thieves entered the first floor and went to the blue room and stole a monet painting. and then up to the second floor in the dutch room, they stole six paintings. some of them cut out of the frames. among them, three rembrandts, including the artist's only sea scape. >> yesterday the fbi tells us the
and intimidate, but they try to find loopholes in the existing laws. and what we have right now is a last resort attempt to provide some protection to the patients who want to access this clinic and to the men and women who work there. the ordinance that we have -- we are introducing creates a buffer zone, that it provides protection of 25 radius within the entrance of the clinic. it amends the bubble ordinance that was passed by this board in 1993. that bubble ordinance was a good start, but this is needed. let me say that what we are doing is something that we don't do lightly. we recognize the right of people to express free expression, to express their speech. we protect the first amendment in san francisco. but the buffer zone ordinance that we are introducing is one that recognizes that we need strike a balance between the right to free speech and the right of women, especially to access health care. no right is absolute. and the courts have found that buffer zones like the one that san francisco -- that we are introducing today, in fact are narrowly tailored and survive legal scrutiny. th
. there are letters monroe wrote to his daughters, to his two sons and laws, to his political advisers, that talk about family matters. he wrote letters home talking about meeting mrs. monroe, other women in washington recorded in their diaries. there is a fair amount about her. we do not have really anything from her point of view, which is merit -- very maddening. >> what we know from what we have about her relationship with her husband? >> they were devoted. they were apart for a couple of months here and there. throughout their 44-year marriage. usually, they were together. there is a wonderful letter. samuel from new york road his wife. he had been at a dinner at the white house when jefferson was president and it was right before monroe left to go to france to negotiate what became of the louisiana purchase. fineote, monroe has a feeling. he cannot stand to be from his wife, so he is taking her with him. that was pretty much their attitude. he was devoted to family, as well. that is really what they wanted to do. if they had their chores of how they would spend their time, it would be with
and as a matter of policy and law. >> reporter: it is a view that has evolved. here's her answer to a question from tim russer in 2004. >> i do not support gay marriage but i support civil unions. >> reporter: a stance she maintained during her 2008 presidential campaign. but while taking political stands on domestic issues, she made favorable attention from gay rights groups by expanding benefits for state workers working at the state department. and today asserted -- >> gay rights are human rights. a few years ago, bill and i celebrated as our own daughter married the love of her life, and i wish every parent that same joy. >> reporter: mrs. clinton's announcement comes a week before the supreme court is set to consider a challenge to the defense of marriage act, the federal law that defines marriage between a woman and a man. and it comes ten days after her husband urged the court to overturn the law, which he signed in 1996. the arc of mrs. clinton's changed opinion reflects a turnaround of public sentiment. in 2004, only 30% of americans supported same-sex marriage. by december of last ye
's certainly something that is reflecting the market and not the law. the law says a hundred percent. >> right. is there any data is that we have that suggest that with a market rate if you raised it by $80 that the tenant would leave. is there some kind of progression that shows that. in this current mark, i don't see that. >> right. it is a 20 year period as a pass through and the market rate is what it is. it's not what it is plus $80. i grant you that it's increasing rapidly in the current market. i think the reason property owners don't have that additional amount is because the demand is able to support what it supports and nothing more. but again, as we've looked at the distribution of tenants and how long they have lived in their property and about a quarter of tenants in san francisco have lived there less than two years. those are the ones that are least likely to get the full amount t vast amount of rent control in san francisco are below market. >> thank you. >> thank you, new further questions? thank you. i believe that is conclusion of the departmental conversations. for this po
opposes the bill and tells us: "to the extent that this proposed law would ban the display of products to adult tobacco consumers, we believe it goes too far." the supreme court will listen to arguments from a generic drug company in a critical case. millions of dollars are at stake as mutual pharmaceutical asks the nation's top court to overturn a $21-million jury award to a new hampshire woman. she took the company's generic verision of an anti- inflammatory drug, which left her blind and scarred. the case could determine the extent generic drug makers are liable for injuries even though federal laws require an exact copycat of the original drug. "if the supreme court decides to reverse the appellete court decision, which is 75% likely, it means it will almost be impossible to sue a generic drugmaker for anything." that was hugh totten of valorem law group. nearly 80% of all u.s. perscriptions are generics. fee hikes for merchants that sell on amazon are causing tension. amazon can thank third- party retailers - entities that sell on amazon's site - for amazon's record profits and
dollars to the cab company. i want i respect the united states and i respect the law i want to go with the law but what i see a lot of people going against the law and not following the things. each and every rule helps for the drivers the taxi cab drivers we work with the people we help the people to get the grocery to get appointment to get to the doctor appointment but there's no one there there's no limo must tang for them when people are drunk we take them home. everything happens they can complain about us. but a must tango owe there is ang there is no one. uber there is no one. thank you very much. >> we'll go to about 3 and take a short break at that point. >> mr. chair man at this point rather than continuing to read names i'm going to ask people in this room just to speak up step forward stand upstate your name and we'll just go with that. >> hi what's your name sir? >> the state of california is full of communists and terrorists corruption and -- >> excuse me: >> the current situation calls for new taxes and medallion demand and supply created this business. the
forward to sign into law the by an of hallow points bullets. these bullets have no place on our streets. and there's another type of violent crime where often no weapon is involved and that's domestic violence and abuse which effects whoo too many woman and children in our streets. we must prevent and report domestic abuse. i pledge - and i pledge to continue to working on the pleasantly with our partners in the community to bring to issue the violation that will prevent woman and children >> i'm also proud that under our probation departments and working with police and other city departments san francisco in 2012 has responded to the challenges a of realignment and intergrating non-violent programs it sport non-violent lives. and just as he must continue to be a healthier city. less than one year our adults will receive health care thanks to president obama and nancycy pelosi. we have a long-standing healthy program and the new international law will extend the program to 3 b thousand san franciscans. and just as we must keep getting health care and pension reform define we must addr
. she says the decision was based quote personally and as a matter of policy and law. the move is creating implications for a presidential 2016 run, a contrast from her 2008 campaign when she opposed marriage equality and supported civil unions. >>> lawmakers in north dakota have passed one of the most restrictive abortion laws in the u.s. and are considering outlawing all abortions. the state legislature pass ad bill to ban abortions as early as six weeks into pregnancy. there's also a proposal to ban all abortion by defining human life as beginning with conception. that's drawn opposition from some doctors. >>> and now for a look at the weather. ho hopefully sunshine and not rain. >> yeah, the west is not quite as bad. in the northern plains, you're dealing with the cold, and in the west, it's a dry morning cute for just about everyone. more clouds in the last couple days. we're watching rain move in eventually. more or less rain tonight for areas like san francisco, los angeles at 54 this morning. we're cold there. intermountain west and seattle area, you still need winter c
the law that the promise was made to abraham and his descendents that he would inherit the world, but through the righteousness that comes from faith. for this reason, it depends on faith so it may be a gift. and the promise may be guaranteed to all his descendents, not to those who only adhere to the law, but those who follow the faith of abraham, who is the father of all of us. i have made you father of many nations. he is our father in the sight of god who gives life to the dead and calls into being what does not exist. he believed, hoping against hope that he would become the father of many nations. according to what was said, thus shall your descendents be. that is why it was credited to him as righteousness, the word of the lord. thanks be to god. ♪ >> as the people stand -- ♪ >> we see here, chris, this is a deacon of the catholic church. he will chant the gospel in greek. after arabic, that was the language. this goes back to the early church when the word of god would have been in greek. it was to the gentiles. the greeks spoke in rome. >> this is a very important da
. the federal government with some of the changes in the new health care law is doing it and has succeeded in forcing it. i don't think it a huge leap that everyone seems to think, going after folks bank accounts there are a lot of more routes you can go to so wallop people through all sorts of means. >> andyprus there is an interesting debate with this plan going on, is it a basically a complication -- com come com n diego or a tax, governmenting take money from people who make things, government is taker people are makers, nobody will dispute that but whenanguage they use to describe when they take from makers. you know, there are the taxes on assets, tax that are on insurance companies that are getting passed to consumer and you know maybe down the line there will be questionable taxes on savings accounts. you never know what the united states will do. neil: all i know, they are a heck of a lot more ways to be create testify get money than spending, very good points thank you, mike rigs in washington. >> to mike a point, the problem with small nation going after its citizens bank deposi
health care law can have on hiv/aids. the panel also looks at some of the challenges of implementing the law. the center for american progress hosted this hour and 20 minute event. >> good morning, everybody. my name is neera tanden and i'm the president of the center for american progress. thank you for joining us this morning for this important discussion of how health reform is addressing the needs of gay and transgender communities and people living with hiv. reforming america's health care system is a massive undertaking. one of the president's advisers on health reform, i know that as we gear up for health care reform it will touch the lives of every american. that effort means it will touch the lives of the lesbian, gay and transgender community as welcome as those people living with hiv. the united states currently has 9 million -- 19 people living with hiv. hiv epidemic continues to raise and marginalize. like the uss russell, this topic is diverse. gay and transgender people live in all corners of our country and they come from families of all varieties. regardless of the d
to push big laws, and then you are occupied with this other garbage and it makes no sense. if people are going to smoke, they are going to smoke anyway. it doesn't matter. it's like holding alcohol from kids, they are still going to be drunk. by the time they are 21 they are already drunk. >> bill: all right. we got it john. skeptical about any laws whatsoever. i think sometimes people believe the purpose of getting elected is to pass new laws. i have often thought maybe the purpose should be to get rid of some of the laws that we have. so i'm always skeptical about that. but at the same time with mayor bloomberg, it does seem that he's just on this kick right? that he is going to make everybody in new york just like him. >> yeah, exactly. >> bill: i'm perfect. i don't smoke. right? i don't drink bill gulps. >> i don't eat too much salt. >> bill: right. and i never have msg in my food so you are going to be as perfect as i am, or i'm going to die trying. i don't think this will work. >> announcer: this the "bill press show." support the drug war you must be high. cenk u
. >> that was kris sanchez reporting. >>> he once wrote laws and policies for santa clara county. today the former president of the board of supervisors is on the wrong side of the law. george shirakawa pled guilty to 12 charges including felony regarding public money he reportedly used to feed a gambling addiction. what was his reaction today? >> reporter: given the d.a. said there was a dark cloud over santa clara county shirakawa didn't speak. fierce fighter for the poor and under privileged told the judge he broke the law. 12 times the judge asked former supervisor george shirakawa how he pled and 12 times shirakawa responded guilty. >> it's a very sad day when a supervisor comes in and pleads guilty 12 times. >> reporter: shirakawa blames a gambling addiction and depression for misusing public funds and for lying on campaign documents under penalty of perjury. in exchange the d.a. agreed not to push for the maximum, eight years in state prison. >> we were aware of his addiction and some of his public service and how the community was wronged. we knew he was going to step down right away and w
of these and other really important because no election law, and a parliament, no legitimate institutions which human needs urgently to build a new state. -- which yemen needs. >> the german president coming on african nations to do more to promote democracy in the role of law. he made the comments in addis abba bo. he met his ethiopian counterpart. his four-day to ethiopia is his first official visit since became the german head of state one year ago. >> when a german scientist is said to receive one of the most prestigious prizes in research, he must be truly outstanding. >> among the winners this year, one of the pioneers of biological psychology. he wants to understand how perception, thought, and action arise in the brain. >> and how it affects our daily lives. >> everyday tasks that demand physical and mental dexterity. but maneuvering a vehicle from eight to be, as second nature to most. scientists still do not fully understand how we learned, store, and recalled these kinds of routines. they want to learn what happens in the brain. his prize-winning research looks at how the brain controls ou
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 183 (some duplicates have been removed)